Fire Underwriters SurveyTM (FUS) is a national organization administered by OPTA Information Intelligence, formerly CGI Insurance Business Services, formerly the Insurers’ Advisory Organization and Canadian Underwriters Association. FUS provides data on public fire protection for fire insurance statistical work and underwriting purposes of subscribing insurance companies. Subscribers of Fire Underwriters Survey represent approximately 85 percent of the private sector property and casualty insurers in Canada.

Fire Underwriters SurveyTM Certified Fire Protection Specialists conduct detailed field surveys of the fire risks and fire defenses maintained in built up communities (including incorporated and unincorporated communities of all types) across Canada and the results of these surveys are used to establish a Public Fire Protection ClassificationTM (PFPC) for each community. While Fire Underwriters Survey is not involved in rate making matters, the information provided through the Fire Insurance Grading Index is a key factor used in the development of Commercial Lines property insurance rates. The PFPC is also used by underwriters to determine the capacity of risk they are willing to assume in a given community or section of a community.

The overall intent of the PFPC system is to provide a standardized measure of the ability of the protective facilities of a community to prevent and control the major fires that may be expected to occur by evaluating in detail the adequacy, reliability, strength and efficiency of the protective facilities and comparing the level of protection against the level of fire risk in the built environment.

The Fire Underwriters Survey also uses PFPC information to develop the Dwelling Protection Grade (DPG), which is utilized by Personal Lines insurers in determining property insurance rates for detached dwellings (with not more than two dwelling units). The Dwelling Protection Grade is a measure of the ability of the protective facilities of a community to prevent and control the structure fires in detached dwellings by evaluating the adequacy, reliability, strength and efficiency of the protective facilities and comparing the level of protection against the level of fire risk associated with a typical dwelling.

The fire insurance grading system used does not consider past fire loss records but, rather, fire potential based on the physical structure and makeup of the built environment.